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Kansas Blog

Posts for August 2011

Step back in time at the Mahaffie Stagecoach Stop & Farm

Explore hands-on history in 19th-century Kansas

Sophisticated, suburban Olathe, Kan., may seem like the last place to find a  sanctuary for 19th-century living history, but look again. Tucked into miles of metropolis is the Mahaffie Stagecoach Stop & Farm Historic Site – purchased by the city to preserve its original character as a thriving 1850s family farm and stagecoach stop. The only stop along the Santa Fe Trail that’s preserved and open to the public, the grounds offer many opportunities for exploring the lives of early farm families, pioneers, soldiers and stagecoach travelers.

Posted on August 8, 2011 11:04AM by Becky Blake

Lyons Restaurant serves cinnamon-rich poached pears

Sample this dish, then visit the elegant Lyons Twin Mansions in Fort Scott, Kan.

Since 1989, the Lyons Twin Mansions Bed & Breakfast in Fort Scott, Kan., has been treating visitors to a comfortable stay in plush surroundings. Guests also enjoy complimentary breakfasts, including Eggs Benedict, omelets and Signature Sausage burritos. Now, you needn’t spend the night to enjoy the Bed & Breakfast’s finely prepared foods, because the Lyons Restaurant has been recently opened to the public.

Posted on August 5, 2011 3:19PM by admin

Where it Really Started

Before the Civil War — before Gettysburg, before Shiloh, before Fredericksburg, even before Confederate cannonballs rained down on Fort Sumter — a battle was fought over the issue of slavery. And it happened in Kansas.

Posted on August 3, 2011 2:10PM by Dennis Toll

Celebrate Lawrence’s Civil-War role in freedom

Activities commemorate the anti-slavery history of this Kansas community

From 1854 to 1861 – years before shots rang out at Fort Sumter in South Carolina, starting the Civil War – Kansas Territory became known as “Bleeding Kansas” for its violent proslavery and abolitionist activity. Forces on both sides repeatedly clashed in skirmishes, sackings and massacres along the Kansas and Missouri border. In the thick of it, Lawrence, Kan., gained the reputation as a center for anti-slavery Jayhawker and Redleg sentiment and activity. The town was also a key stop along the Underground Railroad.

Posted on August 1, 2011 12:44PM by Becky Blake


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